Zombie Kitchen (a Bad Dream Kitchen)

by Kevin Gilday & Tom Gilday

before renovation-70's kitchenThe Zombie Kitchen

Surely it was someone's "dream kitchen" once upon a time--but no more. This kitchen has been dead for a long time.  It’s just that nobody has stepped forward to pronounce it so.  Good sport that you are you’ve kept using it.

You’ve adjusted brilliantly.

You’ve made your peace with this spectacular heap of aesthetic blunders and irritating inconveniences.  You know that missing cabinet door that can’t be replaced?  Well, that just makes it easier to see what’s in there, right?

Once upon a time you’d have been outraged.   Now you are oddly tranquil when  observing that the color palette of your kitchen (kudos to a previous homeowner!!) is shades of farmed salmon flesh.

Bad Dream Kitchen

One day, when a handle pulls off the flatware drawer and lands with a thunk on the vinyl tile, you snap awake as if from a bad dream.  Only you are not dreaming.  You are standing fully awake in your really bad kitchen.  You’ve hit bottom.

But Seriously

Most people pick up the phone to call a kitchen remodeling firm long before they get to this point.  Fast forward.  Months later, you sit in your new kitchen looking at snap shots you took just before the renovation began.  Realizing just how bad it used to be, you can't help but smile.

Oh. And that new kitchen your are sitting in as you happily browse through old photos?  It’s your dream kitchen.

Designing Your Dream Kitchen

What?  Give me a break!  Nobody with a life “dreams” about a kitchen.  That's what I thought before talking to some of our DC clients. Sure. Some smirked at first. But, when they spoke of their kitchens, it became clear that what they’d achieved was in fact their dream kitchen design.

after renovation-a dreamy kitchen designWhat It Is

The “dream” that resides at the core of each unique kitchen design is that of exquisite orderliness.  Beautiful kitchens don’t just look good.  They work—and with great finesse.  It’s all about visual continuity, efficiency and convenience.  When we remodel a kitchen, we are trying to achieve a very high level of functionality, one that resonates with your personal stories of relationship to place, food, and family.  If we succeed in our endeavor, we get comments like this:

“Dreams are not usually realized…. lucky us”  -Dan Esposito

Or this:

“There is nothing I would change”  -Sue Cassidy